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Turning a Temp Job into a Full-Time Career

Everywhere you look in today’s job market, you’ll find temp workers. You find them in some of the U.S.’s largest and most successful corporations, and you find them in local businesses in your hometown.

Temp jobs now run the gamut of industries and roles, and they offer a springboard into a full-time career if you choose to use it.

How can you turn a temp job you enjoy into your next permanent position? Use these tips for making the jump.

Treat Your Temp Job Like It’s Permanent

In a temp, some people fall into the trap of treating the job like it’s about to end. While it’s true that your contract will run out eventually, this mindset can get in the way of turning your temp job into a successful hire.

It’s helpful to treat your job like an audition for a permanent role. Arrive on time and leave at the appropriate finish. Don’t take long breaks, and take care of your assignments. Going above and beyond to make suggestions for improvements or work along with organizational strategy will also demonstrate your suitability for a full-time role.

Take Initiative and Help Out, Even When You Don’t Need To

Temp jobs have defined responsibilities; you’re not expected to help out permanent staff or aid other departments. However, there’s no reason that you can’t lend a helping hand.

Help out others in your department, your boss, or those with who you may work in other departments. If nothing’s assigned to you and something needs doing, take it upon yourself to do it. Aiming to create value and acting in the best interest of the company helps you stand out from the crowd and help you prepare for a jump into full-time work.

Build an Army of Allies

Being good at your job and helping out your team is a good start, but they’re not always enough to get you hired, particularly in companies that prefer the flexibility of temp workers. In these spaces, you need extra help from allies.

The relationships you build will help you make the transition from the temp to an invaluable member of the team. If your boss and colleagues advocate for you, then all your other work and skills will shine.

Are you looking for a new role in 2021? At RightStone, we use a unique process to perfectly match candidates with clients by finding roles suited to your skills and personality. Get in touch to learn more about what we do.


Change of Scenery – 5 Signs It’s Time to Look for a New Job

“I need a new job.” It’s a thought that dawns on everyone at some point, but for most people, the time to look for a new job pops up before those words enter your mind.

Some of the signs it’s time to start job hunting are subtle, and others much less so. Here are five indicators that you have one foot out the door.

You Aren’t Getting Paid What You’re Worth

In the time since you started your current job, you have grown your skills and capabilities. But does your salary reflect it?

If not, then you may need to job hunt. Even if you’re “happy enough,” being underpaid prevents you from investing in yourself, and it could hold you back in your career.

You Get the Sunday Scaries Every Week

Everyone has at least one Sunday when they wish they could skip the return to the office. But if you dread going back to work every single week or even every day then it’s time to find a job that you’ll enjoy.

Your Boss Isn’t Good at Their Job

Do you find that your boss is constantly behind or out of the loop? Are there skills they need but don’t have and don’t seem to be willing to get?

If you consistently outperform your boss, then you may need to look for a new job. Not only does an inadequate management team hold the company back, but they ultimately stop you from reaching your potential.

You’re Still Doing the Same Tasks You Started With

Are you still doing the rote tasks your boss assigned on day one? If everything about your role is the same but the stress levels are higher, then it might be time to start job hunting.

Your role should push your boundaries and challenge you in ways that stimulate growth. If you are stuck in neutral, then it may be time for a new role.

You Find Yourself Browsing Job Boards Just In Case

People who are satisfied with their job don’t browse job boards. Browsing job boards means acknowledging there’s something better out there and you want it.

So if you find yourself browsing LinkedIn or thinking about talking to a recruiter, then it’s time to commit and start your job hunt.

If you recognize any of these signs, then there’s a good chance you’ll either be looking for a job soon, or you’re already looking subconsciously.

Are you looking for a new role in 2021? At RightStone, we use a unique process to perfectly match candidates with clients by finding roles suited to your skills and personality. Get in touch to learn more about what we do.

 


Building Your LinkedIn Network – How to Build Your Career

LinkedIn: it’s an unavoidable part of your professional life in 2020. With 575 million members and countless opportunities, you can’t afford to stay away, even if the notifications do become a bit much after a while.

Are you new to LinkedIn and wondering how to use it to your advantage? You already have what you need to get started. Here’s how to build your career using LinkedIn.

Create a Full, Engaging Profile

Your first stop is your profile. Your profile is public (unless you decide otherwise), and it’s easy for potential contacts and recruiters to find you both through LinkedIn and on Google.

Putting together a full, engaging profile is the number one hack for making the most from LinkedIn. You have a headline, summary, work history, and image to work with, which you can use to show off.

Do spend time building out your profile to create as complete a picture as possible for visitors. And if you are job hunting and want to be extra visible, use keywords related to your job title (or hopeful job title) to help stand out from the crowd. If you’re looking for a job as a Network Engineer, you might sprinkle in keywords like Network Communications Engineer or networking experience.

It’s a chance for you to tell your story in your own words — so make it a good one!

Join LinkedIn Groups

While you might use LinkedIn to search for jobs, there’s a whole world on the site that’s waiting for you. LinkedIn groups are a great place to start.

Join groups related to your industry, role, and career goals. But don’t stop there: participate in the group. Comment on posts. Share your thoughts. And don’t be afraid to send a direct message to get conversations going.

While LinkedIn groups are a great place to get talking, remember that you’re still in a professional environment. Act the same way you might at a networking event or conference and remember how you might portray your organization through your posts.

Accept More Requests than You Deny

“You have a new request.” You’ll get these emails more frequently than you might realize, and more often than not, and you might wonder whether to accept.

Only you can decide how and when to grow your network. But don’t be so hasty in hitting the decline button. New connections can lead to professional awareness, referrals, or even friendship.

So before you make a decision, check out the sender. They could be your next big opportunity.

Are you on the hunt for your next big opportunity? RightStone is placing qualified consultants like you with excellent employers. Get in touch to learn about the RightStone 360 process and see a list of current jobs.


You Didn’t Get Hired – Now What Do You Do?

You spotted the job post of your dreams. You thought “That’s it. That’s the role I’ve been waiting for.” So, you applied and got that first call back. After weeks of screenings, interviews, and the final interview, you find out you didn’t get the job.

Rejection stings at any point of the process. But rejection is also an opportunity. So when you’re ready, follow these next steps to make your next interview a success.

Say Thank You for the Opportunity

It’s not the letter you hoped or expected to write, but it’s important none-the-less. 

Saying “thank you” is always a smart move. First, it’s mature and it acknowledges what happened. Second, it leaves a good impression with the employer, which is good news in case the chosen candidate doesn’t work out or you decide to apply again in the future.

Either way, it’s nice to be nice. So, your first order of business is to accept the decision gracefully.

Keep It Positive

Finding out a company passed on you hurts, even if you half-expected it. While the desire to wallow is natural, you need to remember that making it through the interview process means you did succeed.

By making it through the process, you proved you were a qualified candidate. You wrote a great resume or cover letter, and the hiring manager agreed. You then made it through the interview process, which is no small feat.

Ask for Feeback

With a positive mindset, it’s time to seek out a new opportunity. The best way to do that is through feedback.

It’s important to remember that the reasoning behind the decision could be a monumental issue or a tiny, almost imperceivable difference. Sometimes you don’t get passed on for any reason other than a gut feeling. 

Your feedback doesn’t need to cover why you didn’t get the job. Instead, you should focus on getting information on your perceived strengths and weaknesses. Where did you do well? Were there any stumbling blocks?

Sometimes, feedback gives you closure, or the feedback will help you find a new path forward.

Are you on the hunt for your next big opportunity? RightStone is placing qualified consultants like you with excellent employers. Get in touch to learn about the RightStone 360 process and see a list of current jobs.


Automation – Future of IT

Automation has been a regular topic of discussion for well over a decade. Even still, the world has not yet felt its full effects.

While there’s no doubt that automation impacts jobs, automation also presents opportunities for IT professionals. Before you can harness automation to expand your career, you first need to look at the applications.

What’s Automation Doing in IT?

Automation is part of the software revolution, and it’s made the jobs of IT pros easier to bare. Automation makes monitoring simpler and allows you to skip the manual sifting through files. These realities align with the predictions that found automation would first take over repetitive, manual work that primarily requires following the same program.

Although it’s possible that tech support jobs, in particular, will be most subject to automation, it’s unlikely that these roles will evaporate. Instead, the tasks themselves will change, and there will be a smaller cohort of people doing them.

However, automation isn’t going to do everything for you. It won’t take over from non-routine or non-standardized tasks.

What Should You Do Next? It’s All About Skills

Automation itself isn’t here to take IT jobs. However, if you want to remain relevant, you do need to adjust your skills accordingly.

The IT field is already facing a huge skills shortage in general, but some of the automation skills that are increasingly in-demand include:

  • Network automation skills
  • Configuration management software experience
  • Troubleshooting
  • Scripting

Of course, if you know how to work with automation or contribute to it, then your skills will be particularly in demand.

Finally, there’s evidence that applied technology skills (ATS), or skills that focus on integrating new technologies, such as data analysis, will remain at the forefront or recruiter and hiring managers’ minds.

You Can Survive Automation

Automation reduces the need for highly repetitive tasks, which means jobs associate with repetitive and easily programmable tasks are at risk. However, automation isn’t AI. If there’s a deviation in your processes or they’re not standardized, then they require a human to run them.

You can survive automation by focusing on upskilling and reskilling to progress through your career. Because while you can’t control tech developments, you can learn how to use and protect them.

Are you looking for a place to practice your new skills? RightStone is placing candidates in IT roles right now. Get in touch or browse our list of available jobs.

 


Stepping Up for the Challenge – How to Ask for More Responsibility at Work

You have a set of responsibilities associated with your role. They may ebb and flow throughout the year, but you know them well and find you can achieve them comfortably.

Getting too comfortable can lead to boredom and complacency. But you don’t need a new job to avoid feeling stuck. You can ask for more responsibility to create new challenges.

How do you ask your boss for more responsibility at work? Keep reading for a short guide.

Look for Opportunities

“I’d like more responsibility around here.” It’s what you’re thinking, but that statement won’t win you any favors. Managers aren’t in a rush to delegate new tasks because delegation takes work, especially training.

So rather than asking for more work or opportunities generally, identify those opportunities for yourself and ask for them. Can you see things within your wheelhouse that your manager is stuck doing? Even better, are there action points that you could take ownership of that would add value to current projects or even the business?

There’s almost always room to scale. Once you find the opportunities that could grow your career, it’s time to figure out how you’ll do them.

Create a Plan

Before you present your chosen option to your boss, you’ll need to flesh out the idea.

How will you get the extra work done? Where will you pick up the skills? How much will it cost? What value will it add? Where will the spare time come from?

You’ll also need to demonstrate the stability of your current workload. No one is going to give you extra tasks if you can’t manage what you have already.

Pitch It the Right Way

With your goals identified and a plan in place, it’s time to pitch.

As with anything, context is key, and timing is everything. Don’t pick a particularly stressful time to make the ask — even if it might add value.

When you pitch, help them envision what the goal will do for them. Share the impact of the results’ impact and provide them with milestones and performance measurements to track them.

If they can see the value off the bat, they’re more likely to tell you to run with it.

Use Responsibilities to Create New Opportunities

You don’t need to feel stuck in your role. If you’re ready for more, all you need to do is ask — just make sure you have a plan before you do it.

Are you looking for a new role with new responsibilities? RightStone is placing qualified IT candidates in challenging positions right now. Find the list of currently available jobs on our website.

 


How Long Should I Wait to Follow Up After an Interview?

You walked out of the interview feeling optimistic but naturally hesitant. What happens next? 

The anxiety of waiting by the phone (or constantly thinking you feel it vibrate in your pocket) is part of the interview process. However, you don’t need to sit and wait for the phone to ring for weeks on end. A follow-up call is in order, and it can help you prepare for what comes next.

So how long should you wait to follow up after the interview? Use this guide to help you plan your post-interview timeline.

Follow the Timeline Given by Your Interviewer

In today’s world, good practice dictates that HR will let you know a timeline at the end of the interview. It lets everyone know what to expect and puts everyone on even footing.

Whether you’re successful or not, you’ll know by the date given.

If HR or the hiring manager gives you a date, stick to that date before you think about a follow-up. If you don’t hear back by the date given, give them an extra two business days to get back to you, particularly in today’s climate where businesses have to manage changes at a rapid pace.

Tip: if you had a great interview and want a few extra bonus points, send a quick email simply thanking the team for their time and the opportunity.

What If You Have Other Interviews Lined Up?

Hiring managers will assume you’re actively job hunting, so there’s no pressing need to let them know about other interviews and deadlines at the interview or when you follow up.

The only time you might let the team know you’re being actively considered for another role is if you have another offer in hand and you want to use it to negotiate a better deal.

Otherwise, Wait One Week to Follow Up

If they don’t give you a timeline, and you haven’t heard anything after 4-5 business days, then you are free to follow up. If your interview is on Monday, wait until the following Monday before you call.

Usually, a rejection or confirmation comes quickly after you follow up.

Remember that HR doesn’t always have answers. They can only push the decision-makers so much. So, if things are slow at the top, then it will trickle down.

Use the Follow Up as a Chance to Reaffirm Your Interest

The waiting game is part of job hunting, but you don’t need to wait around forever. If you don’t hear anything for a week (or within the timeline), give HR a call and ask them when you might expect to have a decision. Calling will reaffirm your interest, and it will help you plan your next steps.

Are you looking for your next role? RighStone is placing IT professionals with quality jobs now. Get in touch to learn more about what roles are available.

 


Back in the Game – Relaunch Your IT Career in a COVID-19 World

Whether you’re employed or looking to get back in the game, the current job landscape is full of uncertainty. Everything from where to how we work has been impacted by the last six months. But the uncertainty doesn’t mean that it’s not a good time to relaunch your career.

Here are a few tips for getting back in the game in a COVID-19 (and hopefully the soon-to-be-post-COVID-19 world).

Use Self-Analysis to Start

Everything around you has changed, and if you’re like most, some of your circumstances changed, too. So, now is a good time to check-in and re-establish what you’re looking for.

  • Are you able to return to your past roles?
  • Do you want to return to past roles?
  • What do you value from work now?
  • Do you need a flexible part-time option?
  • What would you compromise to get the right working conditions?
  • What supports do you need to transition back to full-time work? Do you have them?
  • Are you looking to transition to a new role or career?

Keep Networking

Who you know is going to be just as important as what you know when you re-enter the job market. But networking isn’t just about getting your foot in the door of a new opportunity. It’s also a chance to strategize.

By keeping up with the people in your network, you’ll know what’s happening in IT. You’ll hear more about the better places to work, what to expect from salary negotiations — and of course, about vacant positions.

Networking also includes reading. So, dive into industry and trade media to keep up with dier trends. Then, when you walk into your first interview back, it will sound a lot more like you never left.

Tailor Your Application and Transferable Skills

Today is not the time to send out 100 copies of the same resume. There’s a combination of huge pools of talent and far fewer opportunities to stand out in the process thanks to virtual recruiting.

As you apply for jobs that interest you, take the time to tailor your application to the role. Don’t worry if you aren’t a carbon copy of the job description. You can use transferable skills to make your application stand out.

Take the time to think about your skills and strengths and wield them to show recruiters what a strong candidate you are.

Consider Contract Freelance in the Meantime

Being stuck at home doesn’t mean you can’t re-skill and up-skill. Freelancing and remote learning are a great way to get this done. You can not only pick up new skills but put them to practice.

Plus, both options give you a chance to practice the skills needed for remote contract work, which was already growing before the pandemic.

 

Are you ready to get back out there and wondering if this is a good time to re-enter IT? RightStone is placing candidates like you right now. Get in touch to learn more about our current listings and how we pair the right client and candidate.


Questions You Must Ask at Your Next Interview

There’s one big job interview error that almost everyone makes. Do you know what it is?

It’s not talking too much or too little. The mistake has nothing to do with what you wear. No, one of the most pervasive misconceptions about job interviews is that the interviewer asks all the questions. On the contrary, an interview is a two-way street. Asking questions is the easiest way to demonstrate an interest in the role you applied for. They also help you assess whether the role and employer are right for you.

What questions get the best responses from interviews? Make sure you ask these questions at your next interview.

Questions About the Role

There are two types of questions you need to ask during your interview. The first relates to the role and the day-to-day responsibilities that come with it. These include:

  • Who do I report to?
  • What soft skills do successful people bring to the role?
  • What are the challenges of the role?
  • What did the past role occupant do to succeed?
  • How long did the last person to occupy the role stay in the position? Why did they leave?
  • What happens during a typical day?

The answers to these questions give you a good idea of what’s expected of you and what you can expect from the job itself. Not only will they help you distinguish the job from other roles, but they’ll give you something to think about if asked back for a second interview.

Questions About the Employer

Understanding your daily responsibilities is only have of the puzzle. As you know, the structure of the organization can help or hinder you in your job and down the road as you progress in your career.

What questions draw out the answers you need? Make sure you ask:

  • How would you describe the office/company culture?
  • What do you (the interview) like about working here?
  • How does the company promote employee and team development?
  • How does the role fit in with the company’s goals and vision?
  • How does the company evaluate success?

These questions help you identify the goals and values of the company and identify whether it’s a culture that suits your working style. You’ll quickly figure out whether the employer promotes from within, fosters talent, and prioritizes engagement without ever having to ask directly.

Interviews Go Both Ways

It’s a common misconception to think that a job interview places you and only you in the hot seat. For an interview to work, it’s important for you to interview your employer, too. You will learn far more about what they expect from you and the role, which gives you a better idea of whether you’re a good fit.

Are you looking for your next IT role?

At RightStone, we place candidates with clients that are right for you. Get in touch to learn how your next consulting job could be the start of a long-term relationship.


Career Spotlight: Software Developers

Have you seen a lot of software developer roles open up lately? We’re not surprised. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the economy to add 284,100 software developer jobs between 2018 and 2028, making it one of the fastest-growing jobs available.

This month, we’d like to put a spotlight on software developers the backbones of software architecture. 

What does a software developer do, and could it be the right career path for you? Keep reading to learn more.

What Does a Software Developer Do?

Software developers imagine and then create applications that make businesses run. Some developers work on specific task applications but others focus on the core systems that underpin entire networks or devices. Either way, they produce the creative vision that directs the software from inception to completion (with maintenance in between).

On any given day, a software developer might:

  • Identify and analyze end-user needs
  • Design, test, develop, and maintain software
  • Create models to direct programmers in creating code
  • Document and record the application for future reference
  • Collaborate with programmers, engineers, and other specialists

How to Become a Software Developer

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most software developers have a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field. While you don’t need a degree to be creative or to be a great developer, hiring managers do prioritize the skills taught in computer science programs. Developers with degrees find it easier to get hired and enjoy a higher earning potential.

In addition to understanding theory, you also need to know how to code. Even though coding isn’t a heavy part of your day-to-day activities, you know how to direct the programmers who do it on your behalf. Although there’s no ‘best’ language for developers, you will be more successful if you know multiple because you will use multiple languages in large-scale projects.

Your success as a developer goes beyond your technical skills. You also need soft skills like:

  • Analytical skills
  • Project management
  • Creativity
  • Collaboration
  • Problem-solving
  • Leadership

What about certifications? Are they required or simply in-demand? You might consider certifications like:

  • SAP Certified Development Associate – SAP HANA 2.0
  • Oracle Platform as a Service (PaaS)
  • Cloudera Certified Professional (CCP) Data Engineer
  • Certified OpenStack Administrator

Are You Ready to Take Your Career to the Next Level?

Software developers are incredibly in demand in cities around the U.S. So, if you like to think big and find creative solutions to meet end-user needs, why not consider a career as a developer?  Create a RightStone account and submit your resume to receive customized job alerts.


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